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African American Studies: Home

Introduction



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The African American Studies minor (AAST) provides an interdisciplinary course of study that focuses on the Black experience in the United States and throughout the African diaspora. Our central mission is to prepare students to critically understand, conduct research, and interpret the complex histories, societies, and cultures of people of African descent. If you like to read novels, study history, understand politics, or to watch films, then you'll like the disciplinary diversity of the African American Studies Minor (AAST). The minor in African American Studies (AAST) requires 18 semester credit hours, with 6 hours of required courses and 12 hours of prescribed electives.The minor requires students to take two courses, AAS 2310 and AAS 4320. Students can choose from a prescribed electives course list, found in the course catalog, for the remaining hours.

ThSankofa bird is from the Akan people of Ghana, West Africa. It stands for "go back and fetch it". In relation to this minor, it stands for looking back to the past so that we may understand how we became what we are and to move forward to a better future.

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Featured Resource: Keywords for African American Studies

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Library Exhibit

A new exhibit on the 6th floor of the Alkek Library highlights material in support of the African American Studies program. http://bit.ly/2SfZa3x 

February is...

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Each year, Americans observe African-American/Black History Month in February. National African American History Month had its origins in 1915 when historian and author Dr. Carter G. Woodson founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. This organization is now known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Through this organization Dr. Woodson initiated the first Negro History Week in February 1926. Dr. Woodson selected the week in February that included the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, two key figures in the history of African Americans.

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