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Journalism & Mass Communication: Books

A research guide for finding Journalism & Mass Communications reference materials, books, periodicals and articles, career resources, and web sites.

ILL - FADS/GrADS - TexShare

COVID-19 Update: The Interlibrary Loan unit at Texas State has resumed normal operations. However, due to many libraries still being closed and not lending physical items, it may be difficult or slower than usual to obtain some items. Please be patient!

Search the Library Catalog

Search the Library Catalog for print resources, ebooks, movies, and more

TPS:

  • Click on the title to see subject headings (if you're having trouble with keywords)

Where in the library is my book?

After you've found a book in the catalog, you'll need to find it on the shelf. Each book has a Library of Congress call number that identifies where exactly it's located.

Library of Congress call numbers should be read one line at a time as follows:

Example of a complete call number, DA 36 .A55:

Line 1   DA
Line 2   36
Line 3   .A55

 

1. First, look at Line 1:

Books are arranged in alphabetical order, by the letters on the first line of the call number.

Example: first come all the D call numbers, then all the DA call numbers, then DB, etc.

An illustration showing three groups of books. The first groups all have the letter D on the spine. The second group have the letters DA on the spine. The third group have the letters DB on the spine.

2. Next, look at Line 2:

Within the DA call numbers, books are arranged in number order.

The numbers are arranged in numerical from low to high.

Example:

An illustration of five books standing in a line. The spines read, in order, DA 1, DA 2, DA 22, DA 36, and DA 38.

3. Then look at Line 3:

Line 3 of the call number has a letter and a number. The letters are in alphabetical order. Then read the numbers—but BEWARE!

The numbers are not whole numbers, they are DECIMAL numbers.

Example: A55 is read as A .55—this is why A55 comes before A6 (A .55, A .6, A .65, etc.)

An illustration showing six books standing in a line. The spines read, in order, DA 36 A5, DA 36 A55, DA 36 A6, DA 36 B21, DA 36 B212.

 

Other Catalogs

 

TexShare - Check out a book from almost anywhere in Texas with one of these cards. Click for information.

Worldcat Searches thousands of libraries -  built-in interlibrary loan request button allows you to get material we don't own.

Library of Congress Call Number Areas

Subject Call Number
Public Relations, Management HD59-59.6
Advertising HF5801-6182.2
Communication, Mass Media HM1206-1211
Public Relations, Social Psychology HM1221
Publicity, Propaganda, Public Opinion HM1226-1236
Communication in Politics JA85-85.2
Public Relations, Propaganda, Government Publicity JF1525.P8
Philology. Linguistics P1-1091
Communication, Mass Media P87-96
Journalism. The periodical press, etc PN4699-5650
Broadcast Journalism PN4784.B75
Telecommunication TK5101-5105.9

Searching the Library Catalog

Types of Searches

Keyword

  • Combine terms using AND.
  • This search returns records that contain words that match exactly what you typed in.
  • This is often (but not always) the best place to start.

Subject

  • Catalog uses pre-defined subjects. 
  • This type of search works well if you are browsing for a particular subject that you know or a broad term. So if you aren't finding anything, switch to the keyword search instead.
  • Subjects are arranged using the Library of Congress Classification system.

Author

  • Author searches are for looking for items a particular person has authored or written.
  • The library catalog works best if you type in searches in the format "Lastname, Firstname."
  • If you want books about a person, search for their name by subject.

Title

  • Use this search if you know the title of the material that you want.

Open Access

MikeAMorrison / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

 

Open Access refers to resources that are freely available for viewing and/or use